The Governor of the Bank of England has claimed £83 for IT equipment despite being paid £575,000 a year

0

The Bank of England governor demanded £83 for IT equipment while the WFH despite being paid £575,000 a year

  • The Bank of England has given its staff a budget of £375 each to cover telework costs
  • Mr Bailey profited with claims totaling £83.98, which he has since paid off
  • Critics claim ‘a slap in the face to all who have struggled during the pandemic’

Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey, who sparked an uproar by ignoring a call for staff to return to the office, took advantage of his own executive order by demanding £83 for home office equipment, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

Figures leaked by a Freedom of Information request show he claimed reimbursement for a keyboard cover and screen protector for his tablet, despite being on a salary package of £575,000 per year.

Critics last night called the refund requests a ‘slap in the face for everyone who has struggled during the pandemic’.

John O’Connell, chief executive of the Taxpayers Alliance, said: ‘At a time when many businesses were struggling to stay afloat and taxpayers faced economic ruin, bureaucrats at the Bank of England oversized salaries set up their home offices.

“Public bodies should consider these sensitivities before claiming the convenience of working from home.”

Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey, pictured, who sparked an uproar by ignoring a call for staff to return to the office, took advantage of his own executive order by demanding £83 for equipment home office, The Mail on Sunday can reveal

According to newly released documents, the Bank of England has given staff members a budget of £375 each to cover the cost of home office equipment.

Mr Bailey appears to have taken advantage of the generous offer, with his claims totaling £83.98.

It’s good that he admitted at a select committee meeting last month that he earns more than half a million pounds a year.

The spending fury also comes as Mr Bailey was accused of turning his Threadneedle Street offices in the city into a ‘ghost town’ due to his refusal to comply with government directives to return to his offices .

The move angered many city workers – including some frustrated Bank of England workers – who argued they risked losing out on bargaining and networking opportunities, with younger workers not benefiting from the mentoring from experienced colleagues.  Pictured: London's financial district

The move angered many city workers – including some frustrated Bank of England workers – who argued they risked losing out on bargaining and networking opportunities, with younger workers not benefiting from the mentoring from experienced colleagues. Pictured: London’s financial district

Despite calls from Chancellor Rishi Sunak for employees to return to traditional working patterns, Mr Bailey told workers in September they would not be forced to give up working from home.

The move angered many city workers – including some frustrated Bank of England workers – who argued they risked losing out on bargaining and networking opportunities, with younger workers not benefiting from the mentoring from experienced colleagues.

Last night, after The Mail on Sunday contacted the bank for comment, it said Mr Bailey had reimbursed the expenses.

Advertising

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.